News

This section includes scientific and technological news from the IAC and its Observatories, as well as press releases on scientific and technological results, astronomical events, educational projects, outreach activities and institutional events.

MM/DD/YYYY
  • Main router of the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (Garafía, La Palma). Credit: Jorge Goya.
    The IAC renews the data network of the Canary Observatories 

    The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) has finished, during October, with the help of FEDER funds, the renewal of the corporate network of the Canary Observatories, which means that the connected User Institutions will be able, with the new equipment, to augment their current connection capacity from 1 Gbps to 10 Gbps.

    Advertised on
  • Image of the radiometer at 3.5 GHz frequency designed and built by the team at Tecnología Médica. Credit: Unit of Communication and Scientific Culture (IAC).
    IACTEC develops a system which can analyze subcutaneous tissues for early detection of illnesses

    The first tests of a concept using microwave radiometry have yielded promising results for the measurement of subcutaneous temperatures in biological tissues. The prototype has been developed in the programme of Medical Technology within IACTEC, the area of technological and business collaboration of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) with economic support (Training Programme) and infrastructure (the IACTEC building) from the Cabildo of Tenerife.

    Advertised on
  • DRAGO instrument with thermocouples for temperature measurement during tests in the thermo-vacuum chamber. Image taken at the INTA (National Institute for Aerospace Technology) Testing Area facilities. Credit: Alba Peláez (IAC).
    DRAGO passes its tests for launch into space

    The flight model for the SWIR DRAGO camera, developed by the IACTEC-Space team at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), has successfully passed all the tests needed to be integrable into the ION satellite for launch into space next December, on SPACE-X’s FALCON 9 rocket. This project is a part of IACTEC, the area of technical and industrial collaboration of the IAC, which is supported financially (Capacitation programme) and in infrastructure (IACTEC building) by the Cabildo Insular (island government) of Tenerife.

    Advertised on
  • Image and amplification (in colour) of the ultra-diffuse galaxy Dragonfly 44 taken with the Hubble space telescope. Many of the dots on the galaxy are the globular clusters studied in this article to explore the distribution of dark matter. The galaxy is so diffuse that other galaxies can be seen behind it. Credit: Teymoor Saifollahi and NASA/HST.
    The puzzle of the strange galaxy made of 99.99% dark matter is solved

    At present, the formation of galaxies is difficult to understand without the presence of a ubiquitous, but mysterious component, termed dark matter. Astronomers have measure how much dark matter there is around galaxies, and have found that it varies between 10 and 300 times the quantity of visible matter. However, a few years ago, the discovery of a very diffuse object, named Dragonfly 44, changed this view. It was found that this galaxy has 10,000 times more dark matter than the stars. Taken back by this finding, astronomers have made efforts to see whether this object is really anomalous

    Advertised on
  • Artistic representation of the Sun, the Earth and the Moon (not to scale) with the space-time curvature of Einstein's General Relativity over the spectrum of sunlight reflected from the Moon (in colors from blue to red). The spectrum is taken with the HARPS instrument and calibrated with the LFC. Credit: Gabriel Pérez Díaz, SMM (IAC).
    New measurements of the solar spectrum verify Einstein’s theory of General Relativity

    An international team of researchers led by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) has measured, with unprecedented accuracy, the gravitational redshift of the Sun, a change in frequency of the lines in the solar spectrum which is produced when the light escapes from the gravitational field of the Sun on its way to Earth. This work, which verifies one of the predictions of Einstein’s General Relativity, is to be published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics.

    Advertised on
  • Artist impression of WASP-189 and its planet. Credit: ESA.
    The CHEOPS mission measures the properties of one of the hottest and most extreme extrasolar planets

    CHEOPS, the new exoplanet mission of the European Space Agency (ESA), in which the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) is participating, has observed a nearby planetary system which contains one of the hottest and most extreme extrasolar planets known until now: WASP-189 b. The result, the first from this mission, is being published in Astronomy & Astrophysics.

    Advertised on