Lunar Standstills or Lunistices, Reality or Myth?

González-García, A. C.; Belmonte, J. A.
Bibliographical reference

JOURNAL OF SKYSCAPE ARCHAEOLOGY, VOL 5, NO 2 (2019)

Advertised on:
3
2020
Description
There is an intense debate in cultural astronomy on the importance of lunar standstills in prehistory or antiquity, and even on whether this elusive and difficult-to-understand phenomenon actually was then recognised. In the present paper, we seek to address those who advocate no longer using the terms "lunar standstill" or the related "lunistice". We begin by clarifying what the concept actually involves, before highlighting some case studies where proposed orientations to lunar standstills have explanatory value and a strong likelihood, connected to the lunar nature of the deities worshipped at particular sites. Finally, we present some relevant ancient texts that indicate awareness of lunar extremes.
Related projects
 Spring equinox sunset at the Obelisks in Jabal Madbah, in ancient Petra
Archaeoastronomy

The main objective of this project is to study the importance of astronomy as a fundamental part of human culture and civilization from Paleolithic to the present day. Our interest is mainly devoted to the people of the ancient Mediterranean cultures from the Atlantic to the Middle East, with a special dedication to Spain, its geographical

Juan Antonio
Belmonte Avilés